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June 03, 2022

St. Charles Lwanga and Companions

Jn 21, 15-19

When they had finished breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter, ‘Simon son of John, do you love me more than these?’ He said to him, ‘Yes, Lord; you know that I love you.’ Jesus said to him, ‘Feed my lambs.’ A second time he said to him, ‘Simon son of John, do you love me?’ He said to him, ‘Yes, Lord; you know that I love you.’ Jesus said to him, ‘Tend my sheep.’ 

He said to him the third time, ‘Simon son of John, do you love me?’ Peter felt hurt because he said to him the third time, ‘Do you love me?’ And he said to him, ‘Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you.’ Jesus said to him, ‘Feed my sheep.

 Very truly, I tell you, when you were younger, you used to fasten your own belt and to go wherever you wished. But when you grow old, you will stretch out your hands, and someone else will fasten a belt around you and take you where you do not wish to go.’ (He said this to indicate the kind of death by which he would glorify God.) After this he said to him, ‘Follow me.’

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Extending Efforts For Others

Long after the dreadful night had passed that began Jesus’ passion and included Peter’s denials, Jesus asks Peter if he loves him.  A person can understand why Peter felt hurt.  The wound of a fractured relationship that had begun to heal is seemingly reopened.   

But Jesus was not asking Peter for sentimental love or feelings of affection.  Love, in the classic words of the author M. Scott Peck consists in the willingness of a person to extend oneself for the good of the other, sometimes exerting efforts beyond one’s personal limits, bringing about the good of the other and thereby also expanding the person’s capacity to love more. It is part of the graced evolutionary process for humans to grow in depth of their own humanity. Love is willing to suffer for another’s well-being.   

Where in your days, sentimentality aside, do you find opportunities to extend efforts beyond yourself for the good of the other? 

Joseph Lagan is the director of the Ignatian Spirituality Program of Denver

 

Prayer 

Lord, help me to live out the words of St. Ignatius of Loyola: “Love ought to manifest itself more in deeds than in words.” Amen.

St. Ignatius Loyola


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June 03, 2022

St. Charles Lwanga and Companions

Jn 21, 15-19

When they had finished breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter, ‘Simon son of John, do you love me more than these?’ He said to him, ‘Yes, Lord; you know that I love you.’ Jesus said to him, ‘Feed my lambs.’ A second time he said to him, ‘Simon son of John, do you love me?’ He said to him, ‘Yes, Lord; you know that I love you.’ Jesus said to him, ‘Tend my sheep.’ 

He said to him the third time, ‘Simon son of John, do you love me?’ Peter felt hurt because he said to him the third time, ‘Do you love me?’ And he said to him, ‘Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you.’ Jesus said to him, ‘Feed my sheep.

 Very truly, I tell you, when you were younger, you used to fasten your own belt and to go wherever you wished. But when you grow old, you will stretch out your hands, and someone else will fasten a belt around you and take you where you do not wish to go.’ (He said this to indicate the kind of death by which he would glorify God.) After this he said to him, ‘Follow me.’

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Extending Efforts For Others

Long after the dreadful night had passed that began Jesus’ passion and included Peter’s denials, Jesus asks Peter if he loves him.  A person can understand why Peter felt hurt.  The wound of a fractured relationship that had begun to heal is seemingly reopened.   

But Jesus was not asking Peter for sentimental love or feelings of affection.  Love, in the classic words of the author M. Scott Peck consists in the willingness of a person to extend oneself for the good of the other, sometimes exerting efforts beyond one’s personal limits, bringing about the good of the other and thereby also expanding the person’s capacity to love more. It is part of the graced evolutionary process for humans to grow in depth of their own humanity. Love is willing to suffer for another’s well-being.   

Where in your days, sentimentality aside, do you find opportunities to extend efforts beyond yourself for the good of the other? 

Joseph Lagan is the director of the Ignatian Spirituality Program of Denver

 

Prayer 

Lord, help me to live out the words of St. Ignatius of Loyola: “Love ought to manifest itself more in deeds than in words.” Amen.

St. Ignatius Loyola


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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