Get our FREE JesuitPrayer App.
Apple  Android 

October 06, 2021

Jon 4: 1-11

But this was very displeasing to Jonah, and he became angry. He prayed to the Lord and said, “O Lord! Is not this what I said while I was still in my own country? That is why I fled to Tarshish at the beginning; for I knew that you are a gracious God and merciful, slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love, and ready to relent from punishing. And now, O Lord, please take my life from me, for it is better for me to die than to live.” And the Lord said, “Is it right for you to be angry?”

Then Jonah went out of the city and sat down east of the city, and made a booth for himself there. He sat under it in the shade, waiting to see what would become of the city. The Lord God appointed a bush, and made it come up over Jonah, to give shade over his head, to save him from his discomfort; so Jonah was very happy about the bush. But when dawn came up the next day, God appointed a worm that attacked the bush, so that it withered. 

When the sun rose, God prepared a sultry east wind, and the sun beat down on the head of Jonah so that he was faint and asked that he might die. He said, “It is better for me to die than to live.” But God said to Jonah, “Is it right for you to be angry about the bush?” And he said, “Yes, angry enough to die.” Then the Lord said, “You are concerned about the bush, for which you did not labor and which you did not grow; it came into being in a night and perished in a night. 

And should I not be concerned about Nineveh, that great city, in which there are more than a hundred and twenty thousand persons who do not know their right hand from their left, and also many animals?”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Trust our enemies to God’s perfect love

The story of Jonah is about God’s mercy, not just Jonah’s resistance to God’s call. This passage concludes the story with a resentful and angry Jonah, resentful that God loved and forgave the Ninevites, whom he saw as enemies. The key question in God’s dialogue with him is “Is it right for you to be angry?” How often are we bothered that “justice is not served” or that someone we see as an enemy is treated lovingly by another? When one is given the gift of compassion and mercy, is it right to be angry? Is it right to be angry that God is slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love? A very helpful meditation practice for me is to practice loving kindness toward someone I have a hard time with. I imagine them in my mind’s eye and say to them, “May you be well.” In doing so, I entrust them to God’s love, not my own imperfect love.

—Andy Otto ministers at St. Thomas More Church and Ignatius House Jesuit Retreat Center in Atlanta, GA. He is the creator of GodInAllThings.com and author of God Moments: Unexpected Encounters in the Ordinary

 

Prayer

Lord of love,
Help me to love,
To practice compassion,
To let go of anger and resentment.
I trust your mercy and your love.
I trust your command to love our neighbor, friend and enemy alike.
Give me the grace to soften any bitterness in my heart,
And to see all your children as beloved by you.

—Andy Otto


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Welcome to JesuitPrayer.org

Ignatian spirituality reminds us that God pursues us in the routines of our home and work life, and in the hopes and fears of life's challenges. The founder of the Jesuits, Saint Ignatius of Loyola, created the Spiritual Exercises to deepen our relationship with Christ and to move our contemplation into service. May this prayer site anchor your day and strengthen your resolve to remember what truly matters.

(more about this site)



    Visit our
Social Media
   

My Candles

candle

Jesuit Prayer is pleased to offer candles for special occasions such as “Remembrance, joys, sorrows, anniversaries, and special intentions.” Proceeds help keep Jesuit Prayer free for all users.

REGISTER your free account to get started, and you'll get a free 30 days candle just for signing up.

LOGIN to access your candles

CLICK HERE for help with candles

Light up the World

(Click map to see more)

Make a Donation


It is through the generosity of our benefactors that we are able to offer JesuitPrayer.org free of charge.

Would you consider a donation?

Archives

SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
     12
17181920212223
24252627282930
31      
28      
       
      1
       
     12
       
      1
30      
    123
25262728   
       
   1234
262728    
       
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
       
       
       
      1
       
293031    
       
     12
3456789
10111213141516
31      
     12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
       

October 06, 2021

Jon 4: 1-11

But this was very displeasing to Jonah, and he became angry. He prayed to the Lord and said, “O Lord! Is not this what I said while I was still in my own country? That is why I fled to Tarshish at the beginning; for I knew that you are a gracious God and merciful, slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love, and ready to relent from punishing. And now, O Lord, please take my life from me, for it is better for me to die than to live.” And the Lord said, “Is it right for you to be angry?”

Then Jonah went out of the city and sat down east of the city, and made a booth for himself there. He sat under it in the shade, waiting to see what would become of the city. The Lord God appointed a bush, and made it come up over Jonah, to give shade over his head, to save him from his discomfort; so Jonah was very happy about the bush. But when dawn came up the next day, God appointed a worm that attacked the bush, so that it withered. 

When the sun rose, God prepared a sultry east wind, and the sun beat down on the head of Jonah so that he was faint and asked that he might die. He said, “It is better for me to die than to live.” But God said to Jonah, “Is it right for you to be angry about the bush?” And he said, “Yes, angry enough to die.” Then the Lord said, “You are concerned about the bush, for which you did not labor and which you did not grow; it came into being in a night and perished in a night. 

And should I not be concerned about Nineveh, that great city, in which there are more than a hundred and twenty thousand persons who do not know their right hand from their left, and also many animals?”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Trust our enemies to God’s perfect love

The story of Jonah is about God’s mercy, not just Jonah’s resistance to God’s call. This passage concludes the story with a resentful and angry Jonah, resentful that God loved and forgave the Ninevites, whom he saw as enemies. The key question in God’s dialogue with him is “Is it right for you to be angry?” How often are we bothered that “justice is not served” or that someone we see as an enemy is treated lovingly by another? When one is given the gift of compassion and mercy, is it right to be angry? Is it right to be angry that God is slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love? A very helpful meditation practice for me is to practice loving kindness toward someone I have a hard time with. I imagine them in my mind’s eye and say to them, “May you be well.” In doing so, I entrust them to God’s love, not my own imperfect love.

—Andy Otto ministers at St. Thomas More Church and Ignatius House Jesuit Retreat Center in Atlanta, GA. He is the creator of GodInAllThings.com and author of God Moments: Unexpected Encounters in the Ordinary

 

Prayer

Lord of love,
Help me to love,
To practice compassion,
To let go of anger and resentment.
I trust your mercy and your love.
I trust your command to love our neighbor, friend and enemy alike.
Give me the grace to soften any bitterness in my heart,
And to see all your children as beloved by you.

—Andy Otto


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Use this feature to hide the Candles that you dont wish to make public.

You can only view these candles when the "Show Hidden Candles" option is set to YES.

Sorry, there are no refunds on hidden candles.

Hide this Candle
Cancel

7 Day Candle – Blue
$0.99

30 Day Candle – Blue
$2.99

6 Month Candle – Blue
$9.99

First Candle FREE
$2.99

7 Day Candle – Red
$.99

7 Day Candle – Green
$.99

7 Day Candle – Violet
$0.99

7 Day Candle – Yellow
$0.99

30 Day Candle – Red
$2.99

30 Day Candle – Green
$2.99

30 Day Candle – Violet
$2.99

30 Day Candle – Yellow
$2.99

6 Month Candle – Red
$9.99

6 Month Candle Green
$9.99

6 Month Candle – Violet
$9.99

6 Month Candle – Yellow
$9.99

(help)

You are reporting this Candle?

Yes
Cancel