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February 03, 2021

St. Blase

Mk 6: 1-6

He left that place and came to his hometown, and his disciples followed him. On the sabbath he began to teach in the synagogue, and many who heard him were astounded. They said, “Where did this man get all this? What is this wisdom that has been given to him? What deeds of power are being done by his hands! Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary and brother of James and Joses and Judas and Simon, and are not his sisters here with us?” 

And they took offense at him. Then Jesus said to them, “Prophets are not without honor, except in their hometown, and among their own kin, and in their own house.” And he could do no deed of power there, except that he laid his hands on a few sick people and cured them. And he was amazed at their unbelief.

Then he went about among the villages teaching.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Looking past the familiar

What a sad day for Jesus. He is back in his hometown, after performing miracles and teaching with parables, and he goes into the synagogue and astounds all with his wisdom. Although his wisdom is heard, rationality overrides awe, and his own people turn against him. Back on the road again he goes. 

How often are we so familiar with whatever surrounds us that we cease to see God’s handiwork?  Whether it’s the gifts of people in our own neighborhoods (like the artists, poets and songwriters in mine), or the quiet beauty of the West Virginia mountains surrounding me (which I see so frequently I often fail to appreciate), how do we react? God has graced each of our days with enough gifts to drop us to our knees in awe. Today, look around at all people and places that are familiar to you, and see the magnificent spark of God.

—Donna K. Becher, M.S., is an associate spiritual director at the West Virginia Institute for Spirituality in Charleston, West Virginia.  Her training is rooted in the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola.

 

Prayer

May our hearts be open to all peoples and nations of the earth. May we recognize the goodness and beauty that you have sown in each of us, and thus forge the bonds of unity, common projects, and shared dreams. Amen.

—Pope Francis, in concluding prayers Fratelli Tutti (2020)


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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February 03, 2021

St. Blase

Mk 6: 1-6

He left that place and came to his hometown, and his disciples followed him. On the sabbath he began to teach in the synagogue, and many who heard him were astounded. They said, “Where did this man get all this? What is this wisdom that has been given to him? What deeds of power are being done by his hands! Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary and brother of James and Joses and Judas and Simon, and are not his sisters here with us?” 

And they took offense at him. Then Jesus said to them, “Prophets are not without honor, except in their hometown, and among their own kin, and in their own house.” And he could do no deed of power there, except that he laid his hands on a few sick people and cured them. And he was amazed at their unbelief.

Then he went about among the villages teaching.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Looking past the familiar

What a sad day for Jesus. He is back in his hometown, after performing miracles and teaching with parables, and he goes into the synagogue and astounds all with his wisdom. Although his wisdom is heard, rationality overrides awe, and his own people turn against him. Back on the road again he goes. 

How often are we so familiar with whatever surrounds us that we cease to see God’s handiwork?  Whether it’s the gifts of people in our own neighborhoods (like the artists, poets and songwriters in mine), or the quiet beauty of the West Virginia mountains surrounding me (which I see so frequently I often fail to appreciate), how do we react? God has graced each of our days with enough gifts to drop us to our knees in awe. Today, look around at all people and places that are familiar to you, and see the magnificent spark of God.

—Donna K. Becher, M.S., is an associate spiritual director at the West Virginia Institute for Spirituality in Charleston, West Virginia.  Her training is rooted in the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola.

 

Prayer

May our hearts be open to all peoples and nations of the earth. May we recognize the goodness and beauty that you have sown in each of us, and thus forge the bonds of unity, common projects, and shared dreams. Amen.

—Pope Francis, in concluding prayers Fratelli Tutti (2020)


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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