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September 18, 2020

1 Cor 15: 12-20

Now if Christ is proclaimed as raised from the dead, how can some of you say there is no resurrection of the dead? If there is no resurrection of the dead, then Christ has not been raised; and if Christ has not been raised, then our proclamation has been in vain and your faith has been in vain. We are even found to be misrepresenting God, because we testified of God that he raised Christ—whom he did not raise if it is true that the dead are not raised. 

For if the dead are not raised, then Christ has not been raised. If Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile and you are still in your sins. Then those also who have died in Christ have perished. If for this life only we have hoped in Christ, we are of all people most to be pitied.

But in fact Christ has been raised from the dead, the first fruits of those who have died.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Love triumphs over death

Earlier this week we celebrated the Exaltation of the Holy Cross. It’s just one of the times we celebrate what Paul lays out in today’s first reading: the Resurrection is a cornerstone of our faith. Everything comes back to our participation in the life, death, and resurrection of Christ! I remember doubting the Resurrection when I was about 16, as many Christians likely have at some point. After all, we live in a time when most miracles can be explained by science. At the time I chose to believe in it even though it didn’t make scientific sense; now, with more theology classes and Holy Week homilies under my belt, I see it as the best way God could have chosen to subvert death.

The Easter hymn “Jesus Lives” was composed by Chrysogonus Waddell, OCSO, a Trappist monk of Gethsemani Abbey. It was the last piece he published before his own death, and it expresses the bold hope that love triumphs over death better than anything for me. The lyrics are today’s prayer, but I encourage you to listen to it for the beautiful interlude before the last verse.

Molly Mattingly is the Director of Music Ministry at St. John’s Parish and Creighton University Campus Ministry.

 

Prayer

Jesus lives: thy terrors now can, O death, no more appall us;
Jesus lives: by this we know thou, O death, cannot enthrall us. Alleluia!
Jesus lives: henceforth is death but the gate to life immortal;
This shall calm our trembling breath when we pass its gloomy portal. Alleluia!

Jesus lives: our hearts know well naught from us his love shall sever;
Life, nor death, nor powers of hell tear us from his keeping ever. Alleluia!
Jesus lives: to him the throne over all the world is given:
May we go where he is gone, rest and reign with him in heaven. Alleluia!

—“Jesus Lives” by Chrysogonus Waddell, OCSO


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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September 18, 2020

1 Cor 15: 12-20

Now if Christ is proclaimed as raised from the dead, how can some of you say there is no resurrection of the dead? If there is no resurrection of the dead, then Christ has not been raised; and if Christ has not been raised, then our proclamation has been in vain and your faith has been in vain. We are even found to be misrepresenting God, because we testified of God that he raised Christ—whom he did not raise if it is true that the dead are not raised. 

For if the dead are not raised, then Christ has not been raised. If Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile and you are still in your sins. Then those also who have died in Christ have perished. If for this life only we have hoped in Christ, we are of all people most to be pitied.

But in fact Christ has been raised from the dead, the first fruits of those who have died.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Love triumphs over death

Earlier this week we celebrated the Exaltation of the Holy Cross. It’s just one of the times we celebrate what Paul lays out in today’s first reading: the Resurrection is a cornerstone of our faith. Everything comes back to our participation in the life, death, and resurrection of Christ! I remember doubting the Resurrection when I was about 16, as many Christians likely have at some point. After all, we live in a time when most miracles can be explained by science. At the time I chose to believe in it even though it didn’t make scientific sense; now, with more theology classes and Holy Week homilies under my belt, I see it as the best way God could have chosen to subvert death.

The Easter hymn “Jesus Lives” was composed by Chrysogonus Waddell, OCSO, a Trappist monk of Gethsemani Abbey. It was the last piece he published before his own death, and it expresses the bold hope that love triumphs over death better than anything for me. The lyrics are today’s prayer, but I encourage you to listen to it for the beautiful interlude before the last verse.

Molly Mattingly is the Director of Music Ministry at St. John’s Parish and Creighton University Campus Ministry.

 

Prayer

Jesus lives: thy terrors now can, O death, no more appall us;
Jesus lives: by this we know thou, O death, cannot enthrall us. Alleluia!
Jesus lives: henceforth is death but the gate to life immortal;
This shall calm our trembling breath when we pass its gloomy portal. Alleluia!

Jesus lives: our hearts know well naught from us his love shall sever;
Life, nor death, nor powers of hell tear us from his keeping ever. Alleluia!
Jesus lives: to him the throne over all the world is given:
May we go where he is gone, rest and reign with him in heaven. Alleluia!

—“Jesus Lives” by Chrysogonus Waddell, OCSO


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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