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July 20, 2019

Mt 12: 14-21

But the Pharisees went out and conspired against him, how to destroy him. When Jesus became aware of this, he departed. Many crowds followed him, and he cured all of them, and he ordered them not to make him known. This was to fulfill what had been spoken through the prophet Isaiah: “Here is my servant, whom I have chosen, my beloved, with whom my soul is well pleased. I will put my Spirit upon him, and he will proclaim justice to the Gentiles. He will not wrangle or cry aloud, nor will anyone hear his voice in the streets. He will not break a bruised reed or quench a smoldering wick until he brings justice to victory. And in his name the Gentiles will hope.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Mt 8: 23-27

And when he got into the boat, his disciples followed him. A windstorm arose on the sea, so great that the boat was being swamped by the waves; but he was asleep. And they went and woke him up, saying, “Lord, save us! We are perishing!” And he said to them, “Why are you afraid, you of little faith?” 

Then he got up and rebuked the winds and the sea; and there was a dead calm. They were amazed, saying, “What sort of man is this, that even the winds and the sea obey him?”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Model of a servant leader

Some people exude moral force.  That is, they live such a transparently principled life that they inspire others to grow in virtue.

Often, though, these same people are so strident that they alienate their peers before they might inspire them, weakening the effect they might have on the world.

An antidote to this dilemma is to pray for the grace to become like the object of Isaiah’s servant song quoted in today’s Gospel.  The finest leaders that I know are cast in this mold.

The fulfillment and ultimate exemplar of the servant song is the person of Jesus.  Spending time with Jesus and asking for this grace that we seek can shape us into this model of servant leaders.

Paul Mitchell is a Jesuit educator who has stepped out of the classroom into full-time care of his two young sons. He is the author of Audacious Ignatius.

 

What sort of man is this?

“What sort of man is this?” Pope Francis has time and again reminded us that our faith is born from an encounter with a person, not an idea or a theory. If we believe that, can we avoid this question? For the apostles it is an exclamation as much as a question, born out of wonder at Jesus’ miraculous power. Their answer to that question was eventually to recognize Jesus as not just a man but God’s own self. It was an answer shown in their lives, in their willingness to obey him just as the wind and sea do (though with a few more mistakes, surely).

How do I answer that question? Is it from a spirit of wonder at a God who accompanies me? Do I answer it with my life, as the apostles did? 

Nick Courtney, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic from the USA Central and Southern Province currently working at Strake Jesuit College Preparatory in Houston, TX, where he teaches history and coaches football.

 

Prayer

Jesus, you came not to quiet storms but to reveal God’s love to us. Help me today to find a renewed sense of wonder in your presence. Give me eyes to see the ways you walk with me and a heart ready to answer and follow you, wherever you lead me. Amen.

—Nick Courtney, SJ

 


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July 20, 2019

Mt 12: 14-21

But the Pharisees went out and conspired against him, how to destroy him. When Jesus became aware of this, he departed. Many crowds followed him, and he cured all of them, and he ordered them not to make him known. This was to fulfill what had been spoken through the prophet Isaiah: “Here is my servant, whom I have chosen, my beloved, with whom my soul is well pleased. I will put my Spirit upon him, and he will proclaim justice to the Gentiles. He will not wrangle or cry aloud, nor will anyone hear his voice in the streets. He will not break a bruised reed or quench a smoldering wick until he brings justice to victory. And in his name the Gentiles will hope.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Mt 8: 23-27

And when he got into the boat, his disciples followed him. A windstorm arose on the sea, so great that the boat was being swamped by the waves; but he was asleep. And they went and woke him up, saying, “Lord, save us! We are perishing!” And he said to them, “Why are you afraid, you of little faith?” 

Then he got up and rebuked the winds and the sea; and there was a dead calm. They were amazed, saying, “What sort of man is this, that even the winds and the sea obey him?”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Model of a servant leader

Some people exude moral force.  That is, they live such a transparently principled life that they inspire others to grow in virtue.

Often, though, these same people are so strident that they alienate their peers before they might inspire them, weakening the effect they might have on the world.

An antidote to this dilemma is to pray for the grace to become like the object of Isaiah’s servant song quoted in today’s Gospel.  The finest leaders that I know are cast in this mold.

The fulfillment and ultimate exemplar of the servant song is the person of Jesus.  Spending time with Jesus and asking for this grace that we seek can shape us into this model of servant leaders.

Paul Mitchell is a Jesuit educator who has stepped out of the classroom into full-time care of his two young sons. He is the author of Audacious Ignatius.

 

What sort of man is this?

“What sort of man is this?” Pope Francis has time and again reminded us that our faith is born from an encounter with a person, not an idea or a theory. If we believe that, can we avoid this question? For the apostles it is an exclamation as much as a question, born out of wonder at Jesus’ miraculous power. Their answer to that question was eventually to recognize Jesus as not just a man but God’s own self. It was an answer shown in their lives, in their willingness to obey him just as the wind and sea do (though with a few more mistakes, surely).

How do I answer that question? Is it from a spirit of wonder at a God who accompanies me? Do I answer it with my life, as the apostles did? 

Nick Courtney, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic from the USA Central and Southern Province currently working at Strake Jesuit College Preparatory in Houston, TX, where he teaches history and coaches football.

 

Prayer

Jesus, you came not to quiet storms but to reveal God’s love to us. Help me today to find a renewed sense of wonder in your presence. Give me eyes to see the ways you walk with me and a heart ready to answer and follow you, wherever you lead me. Amen.

—Nick Courtney, SJ

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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