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September 2, 2017

1 Thes 4: 9-11

Now concerning love of the brothers and sisters, you do not need to have anyone write to you, for you yourselves have been taught by God to love one another; and indeed you do love all the brothers and sisters throughout Macedonia. But we urge you, beloved, to do so more and more, to aspire to live quietly, to mind your own affairs, and to work with your hands, as we directed you,

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Ignatius’s Presupposition

In his letter to the Thessalonians today, Paul could easily be writing to an audience today.  There are many debates about the right way to handle political and social issues facing our society today, but the truth is that we have one principle that should be guiding our thoughts, conversations, and actions.  Paul says that “you yourselves have been taught by God to love one another.”  This fundamental instruction, to love one another, should be at the basis of our interactions with other.  

We are seeing more hate and polarization between people today than ever.  While it may seem easier to dismiss the opinions of those with whom we disagree, Jesus’s example would show us that our best, and most productive response, is to engage them in a conversation.  In the Presupposition in the beginning of the Spiritual Exercises, St. Ignatius basically instructs retreatants to assume good intentions.  Where there are two ways to interpret the words of another, one bad and one good, we should assume good intent.

How would our relationships be different if we chose to presume good intent from those we meet?

—The Jesuit Prayer team

Prayer

Lord Jesus, through your words and your actions, you taught us how to love one another.  Open our hearts to those we encounter so that we can presume to see the good in everyone we meet.  Help us to respond to the needs of others with love.  Amen.

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 





Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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Ignatian spirituality reminds us that God pursues us in the routines of our home and work life, and in the hopes and fears of life's challenges. The founder of the Jesuits, Saint Ignatius of Loyola, created the Spiritual Exercises to deepen our relationship with Christ and to move our contemplation into service. May this prayer site anchor your day and strengthen your resolve to remember what truly matters.

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September 2, 2017

1 Thes 4: 9-11

Now concerning love of the brothers and sisters, you do not need to have anyone write to you, for you yourselves have been taught by God to love one another; and indeed you do love all the brothers and sisters throughout Macedonia. But we urge you, beloved, to do so more and more, to aspire to live quietly, to mind your own affairs, and to work with your hands, as we directed you,

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Ignatius’s Presupposition

In his letter to the Thessalonians today, Paul could easily be writing to an audience today.  There are many debates about the right way to handle political and social issues facing our society today, but the truth is that we have one principle that should be guiding our thoughts, conversations, and actions.  Paul says that “you yourselves have been taught by God to love one another.”  This fundamental instruction, to love one another, should be at the basis of our interactions with other.  

We are seeing more hate and polarization between people today than ever.  While it may seem easier to dismiss the opinions of those with whom we disagree, Jesus’s example would show us that our best, and most productive response, is to engage them in a conversation.  In the Presupposition in the beginning of the Spiritual Exercises, St. Ignatius basically instructs retreatants to assume good intentions.  Where there are two ways to interpret the words of another, one bad and one good, we should assume good intent.

How would our relationships be different if we chose to presume good intent from those we meet?

—The Jesuit Prayer team

Prayer

Lord Jesus, through your words and your actions, you taught us how to love one another.  Open our hearts to those we encounter so that we can presume to see the good in everyone we meet.  Help us to respond to the needs of others with love.  Amen.

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 





Please share the Good Word with your friends!