Get our FREE JesuitPrayer App.
Apple  Android 

February 4, 2015

Heb 12: 4-7. 11-15

In your struggle against sin you have not yet resisted to the point of shedding your blood. And you have forgotten the exhortation that addresses you as children— “My child, do not regard lightly the discipline of the Lord, or lose heart when you are punished by him; for the Lord disciplines those whom he loves, and chastises every child whom he accepts.”

Endure trials for the sake of discipline. God is treating you as children; for what child is there whom a parent does not discipline? Now, discipline always seems painful rather than pleasant at the time, but later it yields the peaceful fruit of righteousness to those who have been trained by it.

Therefore lift your drooping hands and strengthen your weak knees, and make straight paths for your feet, so that what is lame may not be put out of joint, but rather be healed. Pursue peace with everyone, and the holiness without which no one will see the Lord. See to it that no one fails to obtain the grace of God; that no root of bitterness springs up and causes trouble, and through it many become defiled.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Working for Change

As I hear today’s first reading, a phrase keeps coming to mind, “tough love,” not “tender loving care.”

Every parent knows tough love is sometimes the best way to truly care for a child who is headed in the wrong direction. While it is hard for the child, it is certainly just as hard for the parent. Yet the heartache caused is a small cost when change comes about.

In his rules for the discernment of spirits during the first week of the Spiritual Exercises, St. Ignatius notes that God works with those truly seeking him by encouraging, consoling and inspiring (tender loving care). On the other hand, for those caught up in a life of sin, God induces the sting of conscience, remorse, and agitation for change (tough love). Even for those truly seeking God, there may be areas of life in which sin does prevail.

Are there areas in my life where God is working for change through the sting of conscience, remorse, and agitation?
How might I change?

—David McNulty works for the Midwest Jesuits. Dave and his wife Judy are grandparents of six.

Prayer

Lord, help us hold to follow the divine insights of St. Ignatius and to trust in your everlasting presence in our lives.

“When in desolation, be patient. It lessens the dryness or emptiness and allows us to go through it less painfully. Everything has its time: we have been consoled in the past and we will be consoled again in the future.”

—From the Spiritual Exercises


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message

Are there areas in my life where God is working for change through the sting of conscience, remorse, and agitation?
How might I change?


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Heb 12: 4-7. 11-15

In your struggle against sin you have not yet resisted to the point of shedding your blood. And you have forgotten the exhortation that addresses you as children— “My child, do not regard lightly the discipline of the Lord, or lose heart when you are punished by him; for the Lord disciplines those whom he loves, and chastises every child whom he accepts.”

Endure trials for the sake of discipline. God is treating you as children; for what child is there whom a parent does not discipline? Now, discipline always seems painful rather than pleasant at the time, but later it yields the peaceful fruit of righteousness to those who have been trained by it.

Therefore lift your drooping hands and strengthen your weak knees, and make straight paths for your feet, so that what is lame may not be put out of joint, but rather be healed. Pursue peace with everyone, and the holiness without which no one will see the Lord. See to it that no one fails to obtain the grace of God; that no root of bitterness springs up and causes trouble, and through it many become defiled.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Working for Change

As I hear today’s first reading, a phrase keeps coming to mind, “tough love,” not “tender loving care.”

Every parent knows tough love is sometimes the best way to truly care for a child who is headed in the wrong direction. While it is hard for the child, it is certainly just as hard for the parent. Yet the heartache caused is a small cost when change comes about.

In his rules for the discernment of spirits during the first week of the Spiritual Exercises, St. Ignatius notes that God works with those truly seeking him by encouraging, consoling and inspiring (tender loving care). On the other hand, for those caught up in a life of sin, God induces the sting of conscience, remorse, and agitation for change (tough love). Even for those truly seeking God, there may be areas of life in which sin does prevail.

Are there areas in my life where God is working for change through the sting of conscience, remorse, and agitation?
How might I change?

—David McNulty works for the Midwest Jesuits. Dave and his wife Judy are grandparents of six.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, help us hold to follow the divine insights of St. Ignatius and to trust in your everlasting presence in our lives.

“When in desolation, be patient. It lessens the dryness or emptiness and allows us to go through it less painfully. Everything has its time: we have been consoled in the past and we will be consoled again in the future.”

—From the Spiritual Exercises


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

My Candles

candle

Jesuit Prayer is pleased to offer candles for special occasions such as “Remembrance, joys, sorrows, anniversaries, and special intentions.” Proceeds help keep Jesuit Prayer free for all users.

REGISTER your free account to get started, and you'll get a free 30 days candle just for signing up.

LOGIN to access your candles

CLICK HERE for help with candles

Light up the World

Welcome to JesuitPrayer.org

Ignatian spirituality reminds us that God pursues us in the routines of our home and work life, and in the hopes and fears of life's challenges. The founder of the Jesuits, Saint Ignatius of Loyola, created the Spiritual Exercises to deepen our relationship with Christ and to move our contemplation into service. May this prayer site anchor your day and strengthen your resolve to remember what truly matters.

(more about this site)



    Visit our
Social Media
   

Submit a Prayer Request


It is through the generosity of our benefactors that we are able to offer JesuitPrayer.org free of charge.

Would you consider a donation?

Archives

SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031   
       
     12
       
      1
23242526272829
30      
   1234
       
    123
25262728   
       
   1234
262728    
       
       
       
      1
       
     12
       
     12
3456789
10111213141516
       

February 4, 2015

Heb 12: 4-7. 11-15

In your struggle against sin you have not yet resisted to the point of shedding your blood. And you have forgotten the exhortation that addresses you as children— “My child, do not regard lightly the discipline of the Lord, or lose heart when you are punished by him; for the Lord disciplines those whom he loves, and chastises every child whom he accepts.”

Endure trials for the sake of discipline. God is treating you as children; for what child is there whom a parent does not discipline? Now, discipline always seems painful rather than pleasant at the time, but later it yields the peaceful fruit of righteousness to those who have been trained by it.

Therefore lift your drooping hands and strengthen your weak knees, and make straight paths for your feet, so that what is lame may not be put out of joint, but rather be healed. Pursue peace with everyone, and the holiness without which no one will see the Lord. See to it that no one fails to obtain the grace of God; that no root of bitterness springs up and causes trouble, and through it many become defiled.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Working for Change

As I hear today’s first reading, a phrase keeps coming to mind, “tough love,” not “tender loving care.”

Every parent knows tough love is sometimes the best way to truly care for a child who is headed in the wrong direction. While it is hard for the child, it is certainly just as hard for the parent. Yet the heartache caused is a small cost when change comes about.

In his rules for the discernment of spirits during the first week of the Spiritual Exercises, St. Ignatius notes that God works with those truly seeking him by encouraging, consoling and inspiring (tender loving care). On the other hand, for those caught up in a life of sin, God induces the sting of conscience, remorse, and agitation for change (tough love). Even for those truly seeking God, there may be areas of life in which sin does prevail.

Are there areas in my life where God is working for change through the sting of conscience, remorse, and agitation?
How might I change?

—David McNulty works for the Midwest Jesuits. Dave and his wife Judy are grandparents of six.

Prayer

Lord, help us hold to follow the divine insights of St. Ignatius and to trust in your everlasting presence in our lives.

“When in desolation, be patient. It lessens the dryness or emptiness and allows us to go through it less painfully. Everything has its time: we have been consoled in the past and we will be consoled again in the future.”

—From the Spiritual Exercises


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Today’s Ignatian Message

Are there areas in my life where God is working for change through the sting of conscience, remorse, and agitation?
How might I change?


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Heb 12: 4-7. 11-15

In your struggle against sin you have not yet resisted to the point of shedding your blood. And you have forgotten the exhortation that addresses you as children— “My child, do not regard lightly the discipline of the Lord, or lose heart when you are punished by him; for the Lord disciplines those whom he loves, and chastises every child whom he accepts.”

Endure trials for the sake of discipline. God is treating you as children; for what child is there whom a parent does not discipline? Now, discipline always seems painful rather than pleasant at the time, but later it yields the peaceful fruit of righteousness to those who have been trained by it.

Therefore lift your drooping hands and strengthen your weak knees, and make straight paths for your feet, so that what is lame may not be put out of joint, but rather be healed. Pursue peace with everyone, and the holiness without which no one will see the Lord. See to it that no one fails to obtain the grace of God; that no root of bitterness springs up and causes trouble, and through it many become defiled.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Working for Change

As I hear today’s first reading, a phrase keeps coming to mind, “tough love,” not “tender loving care.”

Every parent knows tough love is sometimes the best way to truly care for a child who is headed in the wrong direction. While it is hard for the child, it is certainly just as hard for the parent. Yet the heartache caused is a small cost when change comes about.

In his rules for the discernment of spirits during the first week of the Spiritual Exercises, St. Ignatius notes that God works with those truly seeking him by encouraging, consoling and inspiring (tender loving care). On the other hand, for those caught up in a life of sin, God induces the sting of conscience, remorse, and agitation for change (tough love). Even for those truly seeking God, there may be areas of life in which sin does prevail.

Are there areas in my life where God is working for change through the sting of conscience, remorse, and agitation?
How might I change?

—David McNulty works for the Midwest Jesuits. Dave and his wife Judy are grandparents of six.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord, help us hold to follow the divine insights of St. Ignatius and to trust in your everlasting presence in our lives.

“When in desolation, be patient. It lessens the dryness or emptiness and allows us to go through it less painfully. Everything has its time: we have been consoled in the past and we will be consoled again in the future.”

—From the Spiritual Exercises


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Use this feature to hide the Candles that you dont wish to make public.

You can only view these candles when the "Show Hidden Candles" option is set to YES.

Sorry, there are no refunds on hidden candles.

Hide this Candle
Cancel

You are reporting this Candle?

Yes
Cancel