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June 23, 2014

Mt 7: 1-5

Do not judge, so that you may not be judged. For with the judgment you make you will be judged, and the measure you give will be the measure you get. Why do you see the speck in your neighbor’s eye, but do not notice the log in your own eye?

Or how can you say to your neighbor, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye,’ while the log is in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your neighbor’s eye.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Who Am I to Judge?

Why in the world did Jesus use the example of perceiving a wooden beam in one’s eye in his effort to teach us the danger of judging others?  Recalling the difficulty of removing a simple eyelash from my eye, I can hardly imagine dealing with anything even slightly larger – never mind a wooden beam!

In spite of the rather interesting and somewhat humorous image this connotes, perhaps Jesus is reminding us that it would be a wise move on our part to reflect on just how well we are personally meeting the standards we often set for others.  Then, we might honestly ask, “Am I prepared to be judged by anyone who witnesses my words or actions?”

Pope Francis has it right:  “Who am I to judge?”

—Sr. Ann Romayne Fallon, O.P. is an Adrian Dominican sister with notable experience in high school and diocesan administration. Currently she provides pastoral ministry to the Dominican community in Adrian MI.

Prayer

Merciful men and women have a wide, wide heart: always forgiving others and thinking about their [own] sins. This is the way of mercy for which we must ask…. Because mercy brings us peace.

Always remember: Who am I to judge? Lord, give us this grace.

—Pope Francis


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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June 23, 2014

Mt 7: 1-5

Do not judge, so that you may not be judged. For with the judgment you make you will be judged, and the measure you give will be the measure you get. Why do you see the speck in your neighbor’s eye, but do not notice the log in your own eye?

Or how can you say to your neighbor, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye,’ while the log is in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your neighbor’s eye.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Who Am I to Judge?

Why in the world did Jesus use the example of perceiving a wooden beam in one’s eye in his effort to teach us the danger of judging others?  Recalling the difficulty of removing a simple eyelash from my eye, I can hardly imagine dealing with anything even slightly larger – never mind a wooden beam!

In spite of the rather interesting and somewhat humorous image this connotes, perhaps Jesus is reminding us that it would be a wise move on our part to reflect on just how well we are personally meeting the standards we often set for others.  Then, we might honestly ask, “Am I prepared to be judged by anyone who witnesses my words or actions?”

Pope Francis has it right:  “Who am I to judge?”

—Sr. Ann Romayne Fallon, O.P. is an Adrian Dominican sister with notable experience in high school and diocesan administration. Currently she provides pastoral ministry to the Dominican community in Adrian MI.

Prayer

Merciful men and women have a wide, wide heart: always forgiving others and thinking about their [own] sins. This is the way of mercy for which we must ask…. Because mercy brings us peace.

Always remember: Who am I to judge? Lord, give us this grace.

—Pope Francis


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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