Get our FREE JesuitPrayer App.
Apple  Android 

October 20, 2013

Lk 18: 1-8

Then Jesus told them a parable about their need to pray always and not to lose heart. He said, “In a certain city there was a judge who neither feared God nor had respect for people. In that city there was a widow who kept coming to him and saying, ‘Grant me justice against my opponent. ’For a while he refused; but later he said to himself, ‘Though I have no fear of God and no respect for anyone, yet because this widow keeps bothering me, I will grant her justice, so that she may not wear me out by continually coming.’”

And the Lord said, “Listen to what the unjust judge says. And will not God grant justice to his chosen ones who cry to him day and night? Will he delay long in helping them? I tell you, he will quickly grant justice to them. And yet, when the Son of Man comes, will he find faith on earth?”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

The Bookends

A man from the back mountains of Tennessee found himself one day in a large city, for the first time standing outside an elevator. He watched as an old, haggard woman hobbled on, and the doors closed. A few minutes later the doors opened and a young, attractive woman marched smartly off. The father hollered to his youngest son, “Billy, go get mother.”

Unlike the elevator story, God actually uses prayer to change you. So when you pray “thy will be done,” you are transformed.  But, if you stopped there, you would be leaving out half the story. The Gospels talk not only about submitting to God’s will, but also about asking God for what you need.  Prayer is both about asking and surrendering. Think of the concepts “ask and you shall receive” and “thy will be done” as bookends to prayer.  Most people either  focus on “ask” with little thought of surrendering to his will, or they resign themselves with “thy will be done” and seldom ask at all.

In the Scriptures, Jesus prays by asking and surrendering. In a remarkable paradox, God doesn’t want either extreme–always asking or always submitting. What He wants  is a dynamic mixture of the two.  Today ask God for anything. Pray for the grace of genuine surrender. And remember “not to lose heart.”

–The Jesuit Prayer Team

Prayer

Lord, you tell us to “pray always and not to lose heart.” Sometimes when our prayers go unanswered and we simply cannot see the dawn of hope, we question the value of prayer. Yet if we persist in prayer, we discover that the ultimate answer to all prayer is relationship with you.

Lord, we trust that prayer transforms us for that which weighs us down becomes the impetus for drawing us closer to you. And in this unity of Spirit we know that at the most elemental level, all will be well. And so we pray the words you spoke from the cross, “Into your hands I commend my Spirit.”

—The Jesuit Prayer Team





Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Welcome to JesuitPrayer.org

Ignatian spirituality reminds us that God pursues us in the routines of our home and work life, and in the hopes and fears of life's challenges. The founder of the Jesuits, Saint Ignatius of Loyola, created the Spiritual Exercises to deepen our relationship with Christ and to move our contemplation into service. May this prayer site anchor your day and strengthen your resolve to remember what truly matters.

(more about this site)



    Visit our
Social Media
   

Submit a Prayer Request


It is through the generosity of our benefactors that we are able to offer JesuitPrayer.org free of charge.

Would you consider a donation?

Archives

SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
22232425262728
293031    
       
    123
25262728   
       
   1234
262728    
       
       
       
      1
       
     12
       
     12
3456789
10111213141516
       

October 20, 2013

Lk 18: 1-8

Then Jesus told them a parable about their need to pray always and not to lose heart. He said, “In a certain city there was a judge who neither feared God nor had respect for people. In that city there was a widow who kept coming to him and saying, ‘Grant me justice against my opponent. ’For a while he refused; but later he said to himself, ‘Though I have no fear of God and no respect for anyone, yet because this widow keeps bothering me, I will grant her justice, so that she may not wear me out by continually coming.’”

And the Lord said, “Listen to what the unjust judge says. And will not God grant justice to his chosen ones who cry to him day and night? Will he delay long in helping them? I tell you, he will quickly grant justice to them. And yet, when the Son of Man comes, will he find faith on earth?”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

The Bookends

A man from the back mountains of Tennessee found himself one day in a large city, for the first time standing outside an elevator. He watched as an old, haggard woman hobbled on, and the doors closed. A few minutes later the doors opened and a young, attractive woman marched smartly off. The father hollered to his youngest son, “Billy, go get mother.”

Unlike the elevator story, God actually uses prayer to change you. So when you pray “thy will be done,” you are transformed.  But, if you stopped there, you would be leaving out half the story. The Gospels talk not only about submitting to God’s will, but also about asking God for what you need.  Prayer is both about asking and surrendering. Think of the concepts “ask and you shall receive” and “thy will be done” as bookends to prayer.  Most people either  focus on “ask” with little thought of surrendering to his will, or they resign themselves with “thy will be done” and seldom ask at all.

In the Scriptures, Jesus prays by asking and surrendering. In a remarkable paradox, God doesn’t want either extreme–always asking or always submitting. What He wants  is a dynamic mixture of the two.  Today ask God for anything. Pray for the grace of genuine surrender. And remember “not to lose heart.”

–The Jesuit Prayer Team

Prayer

Lord, you tell us to “pray always and not to lose heart.” Sometimes when our prayers go unanswered and we simply cannot see the dawn of hope, we question the value of prayer. Yet if we persist in prayer, we discover that the ultimate answer to all prayer is relationship with you.

Lord, we trust that prayer transforms us for that which weighs us down becomes the impetus for drawing us closer to you. And in this unity of Spirit we know that at the most elemental level, all will be well. And so we pray the words you spoke from the cross, “Into your hands I commend my Spirit.”

—The Jesuit Prayer Team





Please share the Good Word with your friends!