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October 4, 2012

Feast of St. Francis of Assisi

Luke 10: 1-12

After this the Lord appointed seventy others and sent them on ahead of him in pairs to every town and place where he himself intended to go. He said to them, “The harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few; therefore ask the Lord of the harvest to send out laborers into his harvest. Go on your way. See, I am sending you out like lambs into the midst of wolves.

Carry no purse, no bag, no sandals; and greet no one on the road. Whatever house you enter, first say, ‘Peace to this house!’ And if anyone is there who shares in peace, your peace will rest on that person; but if not, it will return to you. Remain in the same house, eating and drinking whatever they provide, for the laborer deserves to be paid.

Do not move about from house to house. Whenever you enter a town and its people welcome you, eat what is set before you; cure the sick who are there, and say to them, ‘The kingdom of God has come near to you.’ But whenever you enter a town and they do not welcome you, go out into its streets and say,‘ Even the dust of your town that clings to our feet, we wipe off in protest against you.

Yet know this: the kingdom of God has come near.’ I tell you, on that day it will be more tolerable for Sodom than for that town.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations)

What Can I Give You?

There was a scholar of the law who stood up to test Jesus and said,
“Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?”  [Luke 10:25]

A young man of Assisi knelt down to ask Jesus a far different question than that of the proud scholar:
“My Jesus, I am all yours. You know I have nothing besides my tunic, cord, and underpants. And even these three things are yours. So what can I give you?  (From Third Consideration on the Sacred Stigmata by Francis of Assisi.)

—Alice Camille, 2010: A Book of Grace-Filled Days © 2009 Loyola Press, Chicago IL. For more Ignatian spiritual resources from Loyola Press, please visit www.loyolapress.com

Prayer

Lord, all that I have, all that I love, all that sustains my life are your gifts to me. Change my sight so I see clearly that nothing is ordinary that has your touch upon it.  Lord, I want to return to you the gift of myself. Like St Francis, I ask you, “What can I give to you.”  Let this question influence my decisions, my interactions, and the choices I make this day.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team





Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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October 4, 2012

Feast of St. Francis of Assisi

Luke 10: 1-12

After this the Lord appointed seventy others and sent them on ahead of him in pairs to every town and place where he himself intended to go. He said to them, “The harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few; therefore ask the Lord of the harvest to send out laborers into his harvest. Go on your way. See, I am sending you out like lambs into the midst of wolves.

Carry no purse, no bag, no sandals; and greet no one on the road. Whatever house you enter, first say, ‘Peace to this house!’ And if anyone is there who shares in peace, your peace will rest on that person; but if not, it will return to you. Remain in the same house, eating and drinking whatever they provide, for the laborer deserves to be paid.

Do not move about from house to house. Whenever you enter a town and its people welcome you, eat what is set before you; cure the sick who are there, and say to them, ‘The kingdom of God has come near to you.’ But whenever you enter a town and they do not welcome you, go out into its streets and say,‘ Even the dust of your town that clings to our feet, we wipe off in protest against you.

Yet know this: the kingdom of God has come near.’ I tell you, on that day it will be more tolerable for Sodom than for that town.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations)

What Can I Give You?

There was a scholar of the law who stood up to test Jesus and said,
“Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?”  [Luke 10:25]

A young man of Assisi knelt down to ask Jesus a far different question than that of the proud scholar:
“My Jesus, I am all yours. You know I have nothing besides my tunic, cord, and underpants. And even these three things are yours. So what can I give you?  (From Third Consideration on the Sacred Stigmata by Francis of Assisi.)

—Alice Camille, 2010: A Book of Grace-Filled Days © 2009 Loyola Press, Chicago IL. For more Ignatian spiritual resources from Loyola Press, please visit www.loyolapress.com

Prayer

Lord, all that I have, all that I love, all that sustains my life are your gifts to me. Change my sight so I see clearly that nothing is ordinary that has your touch upon it.  Lord, I want to return to you the gift of myself. Like St Francis, I ask you, “What can I give to you.”  Let this question influence my decisions, my interactions, and the choices I make this day.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team





Please share the Good Word with your friends!