Get our FREE JesuitPrayer App.
Apple  Android 

September 14, 2012

Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross

John 3:13-17

No one has ascended into heaven except the one who descended from heaven, the Son of Man. And just as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, so must the Son of Man be lifted up, that whoever believes in him may have eternal life.“ For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him may not perish but may have eternal life.“ Indeed, God did not send the Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations)

Your Cross

Do you remember the steel cross created from the girders at Ground Zero which watched over the rescue and clean-up workers in the weeks after 9/11? That simple cross became at once a poignant symbol of the suffering and sadness endured by the victims and their families (indeed, of the entire country and world), as well as a powerful symbol of hope in God’s nearness and His ability to bring new life out of death. No human life unfolds without the presence of the Cross.

Some people may have heavier or more numerous crosses to bear, but every person encounters the Cross at some point and in some way. Physical or emotional illness, interpersonal or professional failures, losses such as divorce or death, situations of violence, poverty or injustice, misunderstanding toward or mockery of the Faith by those who reject it, these are but a few examples of common crosses we bear.

We have a choice concerning our attitude in the face of any cross God invites us to carry. We can try to escape or insulate ourselves from the pain of life through various distractions such as sexual pleasure, material wealth, or workaholism. These “medications” are in a sense a refusal to pick up our daily Cross, to engage the suffering inherent in our fallen condition.

Of course, these “medications” only increase the pain sooner or later. Another choice is to accept the Cross, but only reluctantly and with much grumbling, believing that an uncaring God has dealt us a “bad hand” or that life has simply given us a “raw deal”. This path ends in bitterness. Our Faith offers us an alternative perspective. We can choose to accept the cross with courage and even joy, knowing that the Father permits crosses for some spiritual benefit, and that Christ helps us to carry our crosses and to unite them to His, thus sharing in His activity of saving the world.

Gaze upon a crucifix today and speak to the Lord about the heaviest Cross He is asking you to embrace. How has He supported you in your own way of the Cross? How has this Cross borne spiritual fruit?

— Fr. Rob Kroll, S.J.

Prayer

Lord, our cross is riddled with physical and emotional pain. We feel ill-equipped to navigate this suffering. You tell us that we must stop dealing with our cross by ourselves. You want us to unburden our hearts by telling you all that weighs us down. You always listen. We hold to your promise that we are your beloved. Though the pathway may seem dark and interrupted by obstacles, we know that you travel with us and will lead us to safety. Lord, use our cross to encourage us to lean on you and to find our fulfillment in our dependency on you.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team





Please share the Good Word with your friends!

September 14, 2012

Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross

John 3:13-17

No one has ascended into heaven except the one who descended from heaven, the Son of Man. And just as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, so must the Son of Man be lifted up, that whoever believes in him may have eternal life.“ For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him may not perish but may have eternal life.“ Indeed, God did not send the Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations)

Your Cross

Do you remember the steel cross created from the girders at Ground Zero which watched over the rescue and clean-up workers in the weeks after 9/11? That simple cross became at once a poignant symbol of the suffering and sadness endured by the victims and their families (indeed, of the entire country and world), as well as a powerful symbol of hope in God’s nearness and His ability to bring new life out of death. No human life unfolds without the presence of the Cross.

Some people may have heavier or more numerous crosses to bear, but every person encounters the Cross at some point and in some way. Physical or emotional illness, interpersonal or professional failures, losses such as divorce or death, situations of violence, poverty or injustice, misunderstanding toward or mockery of the Faith by those who reject it, these are but a few examples of common crosses we bear.

We have a choice concerning our attitude in the face of any cross God invites us to carry. We can try to escape or insulate ourselves from the pain of life through various distractions such as sexual pleasure, material wealth, or workaholism. These “medications” are in a sense a refusal to pick up our daily Cross, to engage the suffering inherent in our fallen condition.

Of course, these “medications” only increase the pain sooner or later. Another choice is to accept the Cross, but only reluctantly and with much grumbling, believing that an uncaring God has dealt us a “bad hand” or that life has simply given us a “raw deal”. This path ends in bitterness. Our Faith offers us an alternative perspective. We can choose to accept the cross with courage and even joy, knowing that the Father permits crosses for some spiritual benefit, and that Christ helps us to carry our crosses and to unite them to His, thus sharing in His activity of saving the world.

Gaze upon a crucifix today and speak to the Lord about the heaviest Cross He is asking you to embrace. How has He supported you in your own way of the Cross? How has this Cross borne spiritual fruit?

— Fr. Rob Kroll, S.J.

Prayer

Lord, our cross is riddled with physical and emotional pain. We feel ill-equipped to navigate this suffering. We must stop dealing with our cross by ourselves. You want us to unburden our hearts by telling you all that weighs us down. You always listen. We hold to your promise that we are your beloved. Though the pathway may seem dark and interrupted by obstacles, we know that you travel with us and will lead us to safety. Lord, use our cross to encourage us to lean on you and to find our fulfillment in our dependency on you.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team





Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Welcome to JesuitPrayer.org

Ignatian spirituality reminds us that God pursues us in the routines of our home and work life, and in the hopes and fears of life's challenges. The founder of the Jesuits, Saint Ignatius of Loyola, created the Spiritual Exercises to deepen our relationship with Christ and to move our contemplation into service. May this prayer site anchor your day and strengthen your resolve to remember what truly matters.

(more about this site)



    Visit our
Social Media
   

Submit a Prayer Request


It is through the generosity of our benefactors that we are able to offer JesuitPrayer.org free of charge.

Would you consider a donation?

Archives

SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
      1
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031     
    123
25262728   
       
   1234
262728    
       
       
       
      1
       
     12
       
     12
3456789
10111213141516
       

September 14, 2012

Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross

John 3:13-17

No one has ascended into heaven except the one who descended from heaven, the Son of Man. And just as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, so must the Son of Man be lifted up, that whoever believes in him may have eternal life.“ For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him may not perish but may have eternal life.“ Indeed, God did not send the Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations)

Your Cross

Do you remember the steel cross created from the girders at Ground Zero which watched over the rescue and clean-up workers in the weeks after 9/11? That simple cross became at once a poignant symbol of the suffering and sadness endured by the victims and their families (indeed, of the entire country and world), as well as a powerful symbol of hope in God’s nearness and His ability to bring new life out of death. No human life unfolds without the presence of the Cross.

Some people may have heavier or more numerous crosses to bear, but every person encounters the Cross at some point and in some way. Physical or emotional illness, interpersonal or professional failures, losses such as divorce or death, situations of violence, poverty or injustice, misunderstanding toward or mockery of the Faith by those who reject it, these are but a few examples of common crosses we bear.

We have a choice concerning our attitude in the face of any cross God invites us to carry. We can try to escape or insulate ourselves from the pain of life through various distractions such as sexual pleasure, material wealth, or workaholism. These “medications” are in a sense a refusal to pick up our daily Cross, to engage the suffering inherent in our fallen condition.

Of course, these “medications” only increase the pain sooner or later. Another choice is to accept the Cross, but only reluctantly and with much grumbling, believing that an uncaring God has dealt us a “bad hand” or that life has simply given us a “raw deal”. This path ends in bitterness. Our Faith offers us an alternative perspective. We can choose to accept the cross with courage and even joy, knowing that the Father permits crosses for some spiritual benefit, and that Christ helps us to carry our crosses and to unite them to His, thus sharing in His activity of saving the world.

Gaze upon a crucifix today and speak to the Lord about the heaviest Cross He is asking you to embrace. How has He supported you in your own way of the Cross? How has this Cross borne spiritual fruit?

— Fr. Rob Kroll, S.J.

Prayer

Lord, our cross is riddled with physical and emotional pain. We feel ill-equipped to navigate this suffering. You tell us that we must stop dealing with our cross by ourselves. You want us to unburden our hearts by telling you all that weighs us down. You always listen. We hold to your promise that we are your beloved. Though the pathway may seem dark and interrupted by obstacles, we know that you travel with us and will lead us to safety. Lord, use our cross to encourage us to lean on you and to find our fulfillment in our dependency on you.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team





Please share the Good Word with your friends!

September 14, 2012

Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross

John 3:13-17

No one has ascended into heaven except the one who descended from heaven, the Son of Man. And just as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, so must the Son of Man be lifted up, that whoever believes in him may have eternal life.“ For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him may not perish but may have eternal life.“ Indeed, God did not send the Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved (http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations)

Your Cross

Do you remember the steel cross created from the girders at Ground Zero which watched over the rescue and clean-up workers in the weeks after 9/11? That simple cross became at once a poignant symbol of the suffering and sadness endured by the victims and their families (indeed, of the entire country and world), as well as a powerful symbol of hope in God’s nearness and His ability to bring new life out of death. No human life unfolds without the presence of the Cross.

Some people may have heavier or more numerous crosses to bear, but every person encounters the Cross at some point and in some way. Physical or emotional illness, interpersonal or professional failures, losses such as divorce or death, situations of violence, poverty or injustice, misunderstanding toward or mockery of the Faith by those who reject it, these are but a few examples of common crosses we bear.

We have a choice concerning our attitude in the face of any cross God invites us to carry. We can try to escape or insulate ourselves from the pain of life through various distractions such as sexual pleasure, material wealth, or workaholism. These “medications” are in a sense a refusal to pick up our daily Cross, to engage the suffering inherent in our fallen condition.

Of course, these “medications” only increase the pain sooner or later. Another choice is to accept the Cross, but only reluctantly and with much grumbling, believing that an uncaring God has dealt us a “bad hand” or that life has simply given us a “raw deal”. This path ends in bitterness. Our Faith offers us an alternative perspective. We can choose to accept the cross with courage and even joy, knowing that the Father permits crosses for some spiritual benefit, and that Christ helps us to carry our crosses and to unite them to His, thus sharing in His activity of saving the world.

Gaze upon a crucifix today and speak to the Lord about the heaviest Cross He is asking you to embrace. How has He supported you in your own way of the Cross? How has this Cross borne spiritual fruit?

— Fr. Rob Kroll, S.J.

Prayer

Lord, our cross is riddled with physical and emotional pain. We feel ill-equipped to navigate this suffering. We must stop dealing with our cross by ourselves. You want us to unburden our hearts by telling you all that weighs us down. You always listen. We hold to your promise that we are your beloved. Though the pathway may seem dark and interrupted by obstacles, we know that you travel with us and will lead us to safety. Lord, use our cross to encourage us to lean on you and to find our fulfillment in our dependency on you.

—The Jesuit Prayer Team





Please share the Good Word with your friends!